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20120926
20121004
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KRCB (PBS) 24
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English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 4:30pm PDT
talking a lot about how much he likes coal, both candidates mrtalkg about energy independence and you look at how coal stocks did today, big gains there like arch coal, like alpha natural resources, is this a good place to put your money? >> well, i tell you this. it's early to be making bets on any sector and predicated against a presidential election. it is too close to call and certainly not the way you want to invest but i will tell you as we get closer and you feel more confident in the results of an election, i will tell you energy stocks in general, coal stocks in particular are certainly going to be a good investment. we'll unleash the power of the energy complex of the united states, become energy independence. there will be a lot of winners in the energy complex f there is a change in administration. >> real quickly, jobs was another big topic last night. we have the jobs report coming out tomorrow. it is expected the unemployment rate is going to go a little bit over 8%. what impact will that have on our markets tomorrow and on the election? >> it's amazing this is probably
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 4:30pm PDT
that is that why is it that we ignore the food and energy component of cpi? so, i could be ben bernanke's speech writer because he says the same thing every time he goes in front of the senate is we don't see any particular problem with inflation. really, we don't corn prices just nearly double in three months. so, how is it there is no inflation? >> reporter: do you get any sense that the ethanol mandate is going to change under either administration under obama or if romney would get elected? >> well is sure seems like the word ethanol has turned into a pejorative and it's not exactly the most positive topic. i just don't know that turning food into gasoline is necessarily what we want to be doing in the long term. >> reporter: and it affects this market? >> you bet it does. as corn prices go up cattle prices go up. simple as that. that's an input cost to feeding cattle is corn, so you've got to take cattle prices higher to offset that. >> reporter: thanks very much. >> you bet. >> tom: a quiet ending to the third quarter for stocks the major indices falling. the s&p 500 spen
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 4:30pm PDT
the consumer staples area, up 0.7%. it was followed up health care, up 0.6%, and the energy sector rising 0.5%. in the consumer staples sector, it was a couple of food stocks topping the gains. tyson foods may have benefited jpmorgan is named because it bought br stearns ashat instment bank was collapsing four and a half years ago. shares of jpm up 1.2% during the regular session it did see a little selling pressure in extended hours trading this is a single complaint alleging fraud. in the consumer staple sector it was a couple of food stocks topping the gains. tyson foods may have benefited from the american farm bureau responding to rumors of a bacon shortage last week. the farm group calls bacon shortage baloney. tyson saw heavier than usual volume with today's 4.3% rally. this is its highest price since july. and kraft foods fished at new gh on its last trading day as a combined company. after the cle tonight, the company officially splits in two. its snack business, stuff like oreos, will be under the mondelez name. cheese and meats stay under the kraft title. kraft's replace
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 10:00pm PDT
. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we canngage that money in the systemod be eat. and third as ken rightly said, the global economy. we are facing he is vore headwinds. so a number of things to look at, and
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 5:30pm PDT
funner. a more fun group of kids to teach. they have so much just native energy and enthusiasm about the world around them. they live in such a media-rich and digitally-rich and experience-rich environment now that it's-- it's made my job in some ways easier because what they bring into the classroom is really complex and interesting and it's my job to kind of harness that energy and that enthusiasm and direct it toward the things that i need them to learn as far as being 21st century communicators and thinkers and problem solvers. >> suarez: you often hear that teachers can tell who's going to have trouble in high school early on. in the earlier grades. do you agree with that? and is there anything else teachers can be doing in those early grades to help those kids out? >> i think what-- the best teachers are are seekers. we are given a family's child to teach. we're given their most precious resource, their child. and our job is to send them out better than when they walk through the door. and better doesn't necessarily mean that they can ace a standardized test. better means that
PBS
Sep 30, 2012 1:00pm PDT
energy they say is simply too risky. but some are still in favor of nuclear power, despite the risks. among them as belarus, one of the worst affected in the aftermath of chernobyl in 1986. yet, alexander lukashenko, known as europe's last dictator, is having a brand-new reactor built in his country. >> the northwest corner of belarus near the lithuanian corner, one of the lucky areas of the country that was not contaminated by the chernobyl nuclear disaster. a peculiar choice of location for the poverty-stricken nation to build its first nuclear power plant. the first buildings sport a quote by victor lukashenko. the technology is russian. moscow's lending belarus nearly 10 billion euros to build this, the first of its kind. according to the government, the majority of belarussians support the project. we've been told to follow this white car to a place where we can talk. tatiana, like most others here, does not want to be seen speaking with western journasts, especially not if they oppose nuclear energy. she is comfortable talking here on her farm in the middle of the woods. tatyan
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 11:00pm PDT
, time, effort, energy, but at the end of the day, the problem that, the challenge can only really be sustainably solved if you bring these three entities together, civil society, i.e., ngos, i.e., education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: tell me about the global fund. >> well the global fund is sort of, we are sort of the experts there, we are the bankers of the fight against polemics and in our business we say 1,000 months a live, lives so percentage is important to us because ten percent we save 10,000 more lives. >> rose: it is about malaria, hiv. >> and tuberculosis. >> rose: what is project last mile? >> the project last mile is precisely about efficiency so we have gotten very good and reducing the price of the medicine, it used to cost $10,000 a year to treat an hiv patient it is down to $125. so that is progress very well. getting to the countries and then getting to the last mile where the patients are
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm PDT
, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and as a consequence, people are covered there. it hasn't destroyed jobs. when govern romney stood on the stage with other republican candidates for the nomination, and he was asked, would you take $10 of spending cuts for just $1 of revenue. economy said no. >> i have my own plans. it's not the same as simpson-bowles but in my view the president should have grabbed it. if he wanted tomake adjusents to it, go to congress and fight for it. >> that's what we've done, made adjustments to it and putting it before congress right now. >> you've been president four years. you said you'd cut the deficit in half it's now four years later we still have trillion dollar deaf surkts the ceo says we'll have a t
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 5:00pm PDT
safety has been confirmed by the nra. >> translator: under our new energy policy, the government plans to allow reactors confirmed safe to be put back into operation. we will explain this policy to the host communities. >>> people in japan's northeast are focused on overcoming the challenges of the 2011 disaster. but it won't be easy. they have to rebuild homes, businesses, entire communities. we'll show you their struggles and their successes on "the road ahead," every wednesday at 1:00 p.m. japan time here on "newsline." >>> north korean authorities have been promoting their country to the world even as they remain their guard stance. a top official addressed the ungeneral assembly monday for the first time since kim jong-un took power. he says the new leader has opened the door to a new era. but it is hard to know what's really happening inside north korea and when you get there, separating reality from ruse can be difficult. >> reporter: we've been visiting the north korean capital, pyongyang, since saturday. we went to a popular new attraction on tuesday. staff at this aquar
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 4:30pm PDT
. 1.74 billion on the nasdaq. the energy sector powered today's selling, dow0.9%. technology and financial sectors continued lower, down 0.8% and 0.7% respectively. as market excitement has died down over the latest federal reserve effort to stimulate the economy, oil prices have cooled off. oil fell below $90 per barrel for the first time since early august. in the latest week, the amount of foreign oil imported into the u.s. was down to its lowest level since december. and refineries cut back, fueling concerns about weaker demand. big energy stocks exxon and chevrobo fell about 0.5%. they both traded at multi-year highs just last week. the worries about global energy demand have hit the energy service providers. halliburton was down 2.4% today, and its off more than 9% in less than two weeks. discouraging comments from electronics contractor jabil circuit weighed on the tech sector. late yesterday, the company reported disappointing results, blamed on weak demand in most of its businesses. shares fell 9.9%; volume jumped more than five times as the stock closed at its lowest pr
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 10:00pm PDT
. >> well, it won't be finished next year. let me more specific, the international atomic energy agency in its report last month said that iran has produced 189 kilramsf this meum enriched uranium, the 20%. over half of that is already in the process of being converted to fuel planes for the tehran research reactor. so they have only about 91 kilograms right now, which is less than half of what you'd need even if you went to the additional step of 90% enrichment, which they are not doing. >> woodruff: so you're saying it's not as close as what he describes. robert satloff, how did you hear that? >> i heard it somewhat differently because what paul's comments don't incorporate are, a fenway park sill tease of which we're not aware. b, an increase in the nmber of centrifuges that would increase the amount produced and, c, the possibility that iran uses more advanced centrifuges between now and some future date that would make more product more quickly. >> woodruff: so you're saying there's more capacity there than what is known? >> well, i don't know any secrets but i'm saying even at curren
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 4:30pm PDT
technology sector led the gains, up 1.6%. then, it was energy and materials, both closely tied to the global economy, up 1.3% and 1.2%, respectively. the biggest percentage gainer of the dow industrials was general electric. the company slightly increased its forecast for revenue growth, even as the global economy remains choppy. that kind of optimism helped shares jump 2.9%. g.e. said its industrial businesses are gaining momentum. the shares certainly have been. tonight, they're at their highest price in four years. meantime, struggling dow industrial stock intel found buyers, up 1.9%. earlier this week, it traded at its lowest price this year. intel unveiled a new semiconductor for tablets, counting hewlett-packard, dell, and samsung among its customers. intel has been criticized for not moving faster into the tablet space. tomorrow is the end of the calendar third quarter, but we're seeing a handful of companies turn in their fiscal quarter results. discover financial found more customers were using their charge cards. earnings were stronger than expected acustomers used their dis
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm PDT
to develop new source of energy here in america. that we change our tax code to make sure that we're helping small business and companies that where investing here in the united states. that we take some of the money we're saving as we weend down two wars to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately going to be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess, or do we embrace a new economic patriotism that says america does best when the middle class does best, and i'm looking forward to having that debate. >> lehrer: governor romney, two minutes. >> thank you, jim. it's an honor to be here with you, and i appreciate the chance to be with the president. i'm pleased to be at the university of denver, appreciate their welcome, and also the presidential commission on these debates. and congratulations to you, mr. president, on your anniversary. i'm sure this was the most romantic place you co
PBS
Sep 25, 2012 11:00pm PDT
and international atomic energy agency which for the time being is monitoring the control, all the cleared nuclear sites in iran which for the time being reports that they did not discover any indications that iran has any military. they mention in the nuclear program. which of course also reports that it cannot make the 100% guarantee statement that iran does not have something which they don't know, and that's exactly what we believe must be the focus of international efforts. make sure that iran satisfies the agency with the agencies still have vis-a-vis the nuclear program. >> rose: do you believe that so far that the iranian government in terms of the iaea has been transparent and has been forth coming and has done everything they can to prove to them that it has no intent. >> as faras the nuclear sites are concerned, as far as iran legal obligations under non-proliferation are concerned, iran is cooperating with the agency and the agency confirms this in its reports. iran is not a regular member because there was a hidden program which was discovered sometime ago and which is
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 9:00pm PDT
energy. i'actually have a hard time keeping up with peter. when i see things like that, and i remember the way patients were before the surgery, it's like witnessing a miracle, because you see they really do have their lives back. it's quite something to witness. >> narrator: but for people with parkinson's, the hope engendered by stories like peter sauer's proved short-lived. a year after peter's procedure, a series of fetal transplants at the university of colorado, utilizing a different surgical technique than the halifax team, yielded deeply disappointing results. while some recipients showed modest improvement, others wound far worse, unable to even control their own bodies. >> even though some patients recovered, some patients recovered too much. in other words, they started to show excessive movements rather than just enough. so instead of being helped, they were actually made worse. >> narrator: it was a demoralizing setback, and, despite the halifax success, served to largely freeze the field of fetal transplants in its place. >> there's an old saying in science that
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 4:30pm PDT
stock sectors, up 1.1%. the biggest drag: the energy sector, down 1.1%. but inside the dow jones industrial average, it was hewlett-packard getting plenty of attention. it's double digit stock drop pushed shares down to a nine year low. the stock fell hard, down 13%. volume was very heavy, more than 140 million shares traded, almost six times its average daily trading pace. c.e.o. meg whitman surprised investors by warning of a deeper than expected slide in earnings next year. revenue in all of its business divisions except for software is expected to fall. >> h.p. has done a bad job adjusting to where the business environment is headed. we see stagnating revenue, we see things actually getting worse next year relative to what analysts expected and that's not necessarily something cost cutting can save in and of itself. >> tom: those job cuts will total 29,000 when they're done. h.p. also vowed to reduce the number of products it sells, and c.e.o. whitman said the biggest challenge has been c.e.o. turnover. she's the third chief executive in as many year. h.p.'s news hit others w
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 11:00pm PDT
hope not. first, so as nuclear energy is concerned, iran has a right to develop nuclear energy but for military use, no way, because it is too dangerous. not because it is iran but because-- if it goes that way, it means the region can be a terrible menace. therefore, no way. the question is how do you convince iran to evolve? we have-- when i saw "we" it's the big 5-- france, u.s., british, china, and russia. we're united on this issue. >> rose: the 5 plus 1 germany. >> yes, and we were sussi with iran and trying to convince them to change and we are applying sanctions. the fact is, up to now, iran has not changed. >> rose: it's not changed its behavior because of the sanctions. we have a report of the international agency they go that enfortunately, they're disrupting their program. and my own belief that what they are doing cannot be explained if ty have decided not to go nuclear. there were, we have to say, and we are saying to them, do negotiate because it's not possibly for you to have-- to go to a nuclear weapon. >> rose: in other words you said to them we need to find a neg
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 5:00pm PDT
health back in order in that prompted people to sell energy and high-tech. we had news in the political front on wednesday. the opposition liberal democratic party picked shinzo abe as the new person. >>> we're learning about how political tensions between japan and china is affecting the economy. do you see that happening through the stock markets? >> indeed. investors will continue to keep a close eye on the political tensions between japan and china. we are, in fact hearing more news that the tension -- the rift is affecting japanese businesses and corporate activity. on wednesday, ana said that 40,000 seat reservations have been cancelled. we will keep an eye on china related issues. >>> turning to the currency market the yen gained ground against the dollar and the euro. the euro/yen around $99.99. euro/yen hit a two-week low of around 99.70 in european trading and that led to gns in the yen against the dollar, that pair pretty much remained in european trading and new york trading. back to you. >> catch you later. >>> japanese firms are asking mean mar to improve the bus
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:00pm PDT
vehicles and green energy products. this is what walking sticks may look like in the future. it moves with wheels, and wheels move with a sensor in here. withven slight hand pressure of my hands. major electronic device-maker murata manufacturing co developed this item with a small osaka company that specializes in devices to assist the elderly and the infirm. nearly a quarter of the japanese population is over 65 years of age. there is a growing market for products for the elderly and manufacturers are becoming increasingly innovative. >> translator: i think the senior market will expand as the number of older people increases. there's also demand in europe, the u.s. and other developed countries. >> reporter: this product supports the wearer's joints and muscles. this man can easily carry more than 50 kilograms. the suit-makers say they developed it to help older people working a manual job. many newer blood pressure monito contain embedded remote communication devices. this allows them to instantly transfer data to smartphones or computers. the idea is to provide up-to-the-minute inform
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 11:00pm PDT
that brooklyn today sort of represents the urban energy of 21st century new york city. our audience is very young. they're very diverse. they're ready to be challenged. they're adventurous. and i think that that's sort of the vibe and the whole attitude of brooklyn. so the sports, the culture, everything that's happening sort of fits together right now. it's the brooklyn moment. >> rose: and people when they think new york, you want them to think brooklyn? >> yeah. and i think that people are thinking brooklyn. because of all of this energy that we just talked about. because there is this sort of edge and attitude that is brooklyn. and i think bam has been a large part of sdwrooifing that revitally sags. >> rose: everybody that knows brooklyn knows bam and when you think abou brooklyn you think about bam because it's always been a cull cultural center for thinking about what's going on. >> well, it's interesting to hear them talk about the fact that there was a disaster in the region and they had to really try to move forward to enhance the economy and culture of the regions. bruce
PBS
Sep 30, 2012 8:30am PDT
, "i'm tired, i feel overworked." you give off total energy. but for you, this... for you to sing, it is work. >> oh, absolutely. it is why so many of my contemporaries, when they start to work less, you find their voices getting weaker, because you've got to do it. and by me singing, trying to sing over a group of drinking people three times a night, it was nothing but exercise for my voice, just making it stronger and stronger and stronger. so by the time they did call, i was cool. >> hinojosa: you say that when you perform sometimes... and for those who haven't heard you, just when you're hearing you sing on a cd, it is as if your whole body is coming through. and you say that sometimes after you perform, you feel like you have actually been beat up. >> yeah, well, now, too, it's the travel of any kind. at first, i had always dreamed of being able to travel and take my band on a plane. we hate the airport. so now i'm back to, "i'll be okay if i'm in the car." i hate the car. but when you mix the traveling all day, and then getting off and doing the thing at night, if i had been doi
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)